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Okoye named to UICC’s Advisory Board

BMRN’s Professor Okoye has just been named to the UICC’s (Union for International Cancer Control) Advisory Board as the “African Observer”, allowing her to expand global advocacy for patients of African descent.

 

BMRN featured in the Lancet

Bone marrow registry featured in the Lancet

 
BMRN Founder Honored as “Stem Cell Hero”

BMRN Founder Honored as “Stem Cell Hero”

“This is a title I have yet to earn,” said Mr. Adebiyi at the New York Stem Cell Foundation‘s annual gala.

 
BBC covers Nigerian registry

BBC covers Nigerian registry

BBC’s  Focus on Africa article features two personal stories behind the launch of Nigeria’s first bone marrow registry: stem cell donor Bisi Bokinni and stem cell recipient (and BMRN founder) Seun Adebiyi

 

New African Bone Marrow Registry

Bone marrow transplants, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), treat more than 70 different diseases, including some types of leukemia, lymphoma, and sickle cell anaemia.

 

New Facebook Page for Bone Marrow Registry in Nigeria

Go ‘like’ our facebook page and stay up to date with all of the exciting news!

 

Nigeria Launches Bone Marrow Registry

February 24, 2012 marked the launch of the first bone marrow registry in Nigeria, and only the second such registry in all of Africa. This launch was a milestone step in the country’s efforts to treat cancer patients throughout Africa and the world.

 

Seun Adebiyi Creates First Bone Marrow Registry in Nigeria

NYSCF sends congratulations to aspiring 2014 Winter Olympian, lawyer, and friend of the organization Seun Adebiyi for his lifesaving work in creating the first bone marrow registry in Nigeria.

 
Nigerian Bone Marrow Registry an ‘Important Milestone’

Nigerian Bone Marrow Registry an ‘Important Milestone’

The Nigerian bone marrow registry hopes to boost matches between donors and patients, reports Irin News of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. .

 

Nigerian Graduate Breaks Fresh Ground on Cancer Therapy

Before cord blood became common in the 1990s, blacks almost never found matches. “In 1990, we only found six matches for African-Americans, and all of them had typical European genes,” Dr. Pablo Rubinstein said.